Candace Walworth | 303-245-4712

Professor of Peace Studies
Core Faculty


BA in Peace Studies


PhD, Union Institute and University
MA, Vermont College of Norwich University
BA, University of Illinois

From the heart

What’s joyous about Naropa? So many folks here are engaged with what matters to them—there’s a palpable energy of aliveness, a fiery desire to make a positive contribution. Thomas Merton, a Trappist monk-activist, wrote that the function of a university is to teach a person how to drink tea. Why? Because drinking tea is ordinary. “Every action, however small, can teach you everything—provided you see who it is that is acting.” Contemplative education in a nutshell.


President’s Award for Outstanding faculty (1993 and 1999)

Naropa Student Union (SUN) Faculty of the Year award (2005 and 2008)

Recent conference presentation venues

  • 6th International Digital Storytelling Conference—“Voices of Change: Storywork in Activism, Education and Public Service” (Smith College)
  • Conference on Community Writing: Building Engaged Infrastructure (University of Colorado at Boulder)
  • Peace Forum on “Peace Studies for the Developing World” (Mahachulalongkornrajavidyalaya University, Thailand)
  • The Association for Authentic and Evidence-based Learning (Boston)
  • 6th International Conflict Resolution Education Summit—“Bridging Cultures: Education for Global Citizenship and Engagement” (Cleveland)
  • Front Range Bioneers (University of Colorado at Boulder)

Recent Writing:

Review of “The Open Hand: Arguing as an Art of Peace“ by Barry Kroll

“Guardians of Pachamama,” one of my digital stories 

Make the Path by Walking,” a digital archive of my contemplative, scholarly, community-engaged and artistic investigations

Research activity

My teaching and research interests include socially engaged spirituality, the socially engaged imagination, and the practice of dialogue in conflict transformation. I am a passionate community-engaged teacher and scholar working in Interdisciplinary Studies with concentrations in peace, social justice and sustainability. I engage in collaborative projects with students that take us into the community and bring scholars, activists and social innovators into the classroom. My current work builds on my dissertation (a biography) and my life-long love of narrative—from tiny forms like digital stories to oral histories and documentary.

Courses taught

  • Community-based Learning and Action (COR 220)
  • Introduction to Peace & Conflict Studies (PAX 250)
  • Conflict Transformation: Theory & Practice (PAX 340)
  • Skills for Peacebuilding: Leadership, Dialogue and Restorative Justice (PAX 345)
  • Senior Project (PAX 480)

What books do you find yourself pressing into the hands of students?

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate by Naomi Klein